Lost or Found Cats

Lost or Found Cats

Finding a Lost Cat

Follow these steps and don’t stop looking!

  • Go to the spot where the cat was lost and then go door-to-door from there with posters, working outward in a spiral. Ask to look in sheds, garages, basements, and explain why (cats often go to ground pretty nearby). Ask the neighbors to call about any sightings whatsoever.
  • Go out when it’s dark with a flashlight and look under cars and bushes. (You can see the kitty’s eyes shining at night with a flashlight.)
  • Place food at the spot from which the cat was lost.
  • Physically go to all municipal and private shelters in your city and those nearby. Look at all cats, including those in sick/isolation and feral cat rooms. Look at cats described even vaguely like your cat; the public and shelter staff often vary widely in their descriptions. Sometimes people bring cats to a private shelter and say they’re relinquishing theirs when it’s actually a stray.
  • Check dead-on-arrival logs.  Ensure your lost pet report is in the right place. Shelters are busy places and staff have many other commitments.
  • Recheck shelters every couple of days (if possible).
  • Run a lost pet ad in local paper(s) (sometimes they’re free)
  • Check your local craigslist and post a lost cat ad there
  • Place posters at vets, ER vets, pet food stores, on streets near where the kitty was lost, at commercial places near where the kitty was lost, laundromats, post offices, schools (kids often notice new stray cats). Download a sample Lost Cat Flyer in Word from Cats in the Bag, a website that provides detailed advice for finding lost cats.
  • Don’t give up! Cats get frightened and hunker down. Also, people often see a new cat for awhile, start to feed him or her, then several weeks later decide to list him or her as “Found.”